Giro 100. Time Trials And Automobiles.

Learco Guerra at the end of the 1934 Giro

Today we see the first time trial in this years Giro. The first time trial of any Giro was held in the 1933 edition. The introduction of the race against the clock would have a huge influence on who could contend for the title. Before you had to be an excellent climber and have a strong team in the rolling stages but now a new skill was needed. Specialists in time trialing could make up deficits lost in the mountains and pure climbers would see their chances of winning the Giro erode in the race against the truth. The 1933 race was also the first edition where the mountains competition was run, perhaps the organisers set it up as some kind of consolation for the climbers.

The ’33 race is seen as the first modern Giro and has many similarities to what we are used to in Grand Tours today. The type of rider who would win the Giro from 1933 on would be similar to the GC riders who could be victorious this year. The Giro itself was nearly what we are used to seeing these days too. It was up to 17 stages where before it was between 9 and 13 and it also had the races first publicity caravan. One difference was the mountain stages were at the start of the race followed by the flat stages and time trial.

The time trial was run on the 13th stage between Bologna and Ferrara and was 62 km long. It was won by over a minute by Alfredo Binda who was a rare breed of rider that can climb like an angel but also has the horsepower to win against the clock. In the end the time trial didn’t make much difference. Binda was at the top of his game that year and won the race by over 12 minutes. It wasn’t till the next year that it became obvious how important time trials were.

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Giro 100. What? No Team Time Trial? And The 1912 Team Race.

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Photo by Sean Rowe on flickr.

2017 will be the second year in a row that there will be no Team Time Trial at the Giro d’Italia. This comes after a decade of them being a regular feature in one of the first five stages of the race. As someone who enjoys a team time trial I’m hoping they make a return in future editions. You used to be able to count on one being in the Giro and Tireno-Adriatico which was good as the Tour de France and shorter French stage races hardly ever bother with them.

I enjoy them for a number of reasons. Firstly, they are incredibly photogenic. Lines of colourful riders on shining TT bikes is to me top class bike porn. Watching the lines break up as the riders start rotating can also be quite mesmerising to watch. However you can quickly snap out of this meditative state as any rider who crashes will often take down a number of his teammates with him.

This sense of it being a team event is another thing I like about the team time trials. A rider with ambitions for the GC will only get the same time as his teams fifth fasted rider so everyone has to pull together. When they do it presents an opportunity for one of the lesser riders to get a great reward. Usually gregarios grind themselves down in service of their leader and have little to show for it. If their team wins the time trial though they can get given the chance to become race leader. In recent years Svein Tuft, Salvatore Puccio, Ramunas Navardauskas and Marco Pinotti have benefited from being allowed to be the first across the line of the fasted team thus donning the Maglio Rosa the next day.

There was one edition of the race where the riders finishing time contributed to who won the race in every single stage.

Continue reading “Giro 100. What? No Team Time Trial? And The 1912 Team Race.”