Should the race have been neutralised? Views on stage 9 of the Giro.

Yesterday after a race which alternated between dull and fairly dull the 100th Giro d’Italia finally ignited. However even after some great performances from Nairo Quintana, Tom Dumoulin and Thibault Pinot the main talking point was an incident which happened just before the main action on Blockhaus was about to start. A police motorbikes, of all things, had inexplicably stopped on the road causing one … Continue reading Should the race have been neutralised? Views on stage 9 of the Giro.

Giro 100. Blockhaus And Merckx. New Stars Are Born.

The Giro d’Italia, now in its centenary edition is one of the most respected and important races in the world. Back in 1909 when 115 riders lined up in Milan to start the first edition the organisers would have still been wondering and worrying if the event was going to be a success. It wouldn’t have taken long for them to realise that they were on to a winner. Huge crowds gathered at the stage finishes and perhaps more importantly sales of the Gazzetta della Sport increased as the captivated country were desperate to find out what was happening in the race. The future and fame of the Giro was guaranteed. This month it is exactly 50 years since another two now icons of the cycling world were introduced to the Grand Tour scene.

The route of the 1967 Giro included a summit finish up a climb never before used in the race. Blockhaus sounds more like the name of a Kraftwerk album than a climb in the middle of Italy. Only a handful of riders from the area would have been familiar with it and many starting the 12th stage in Caserta may have wondered if they needed to go down an autobahn to reach it. What they encountered after nearly 200 km in the saddle was a 30 km slog with an average gradient of 6.5% with hardly any leveling out to help them gather their senses. And the further they got from the bottom the more exposed to the elements they became as the trees thinned out.

One rider who was seemingly unfazed by such a monster was the 22 year old man-machine Eddy Merckx. He had been making a name for himself as a brilliant classics rider and although still such a young age he had already won Gent-Wevelgem and La Flèche Wallonne as well as Milan-San Remo twice. The 1967 Giro was to be his first Grand Tour and on the 12th stage, lying 7th overall, he was showing that he could compete in the big mountains deep into the second week. With a little over 2 km of Blockhaus left Italo Zilioli attacked out of the leading group and only Merckx was able to respond. As a tired looking bunch containing former Giro winners Jacques Anquetil, Gianni Motta and Franco Balmamion neared the end a sprightly looking Merckx was about to cross the finishing line. It was his first Grand Tour stage, he had beaten Anquetil into 4th place, this was the changing of the guard. Merckx showed his versatility two days later by winning a flat stage and ended up 9th overall only suffering badly in one stage on the penultimate day. This was a successful start to Merckx’s roller-coaster relationship with the Giro d’Italia.

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Giro 100. Binda Beats Girardengo in Bari.

 

Alfredo_Binda_3.jpgToday’s stage starts in Molfetta just on the outskirts of Bari, the city which saw the first victory of one of the all time greats of Italian and World cycling. The 5th stage of the 1925 Giro was won by a 23 year old Giro debutante named Alfredo Binda, beating the first great campionissimo Costante Girardengo into second place. The race that year was meant to be Girardengo’s swansong and as he was hugely popular most Italy were desperate for Girardengo to win his third and final Giri. As it was, Binda had gained the race lead in the previous stage and held the advantage till Milan beating Girardengo into second place by 4 minutes 58 seconds.

This started Binda’s divisive relationship with the countries cycling fans. His win was hugely unpopular in Italy, not only had the great champion been beaten but some fans thought he was getting usurped by an outsider as they considered Binda to be un-Italian. He was born in the town of Cittiglio in the north of the country but due to the poverty that effected his family he had been forced to move to Nice at a young age to live with an uncle. This was out of necessity to survive but it meant that he spoke with a mix of a rural dialect from his place of birth and French.

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Giro 100. Maglia Nera

 

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Luigi Malabrocca

The Maglia Rosa has been the striking symbol worn by the leader of the Giro d’Italia since 1931. In 1946 the organisers decided it was time bring out a second jersey which was to be worn by the ‘leader’ of a separate contest within the Giro. It wasn’t given, as you might expect, to the rider winning the mountains or points classification. The climbers competition has run since 1933 but there was no leaders jersey until 1974 when the Spaniard José Manuel Fuente was the first to wear the green maglia verde (It is now the blue maglia azzurra). He wore it through the whole race so also became the first to win it. The points competition was first run in 1958 then disappeared till 1966 and in 1967 the first maglia rosso (red jersey) was worn by Giorgio Zancanaro and eventually won by the then reigning Tour of Flanders champion Dino Zandegù. (In 1970 the maglia rosso became the maglia ciclamino which was mauve. It went back to red in 2010 but the maglia ciclamino returns this year).

The new jersey which arrived in 1946 was black and it was awarded to the man who was placed last at the Giro d’Italia. The colour of the jersey was chosen as it was a gloomy alternative to the leaders striking pink but there was also a possible political undertone to it. The 1946 race was the first edition since the Second World War. Fascism had been defeated and the fascist uniform, the black shirt, was something that no longer commanded respect, it was to be ridiculed. Those wearing black shirts were no longer the leaders at the top, they were the losers. The race director Vincenzo Torriani was known to have anti-fascist sympathies which may explain the colour but his reason for creating the icon of the black jersey was as much to do with marketing as anything else. Race fans would hang around the stage end for a lot longer to catch a sight of the black jersey coming in, perhaps spending a little money as they did so.

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Giro 100. The Maglia Rosa And Learco Guerra.

 

Now that the 100th Giro d’Italia has reached the 6th stage there have been opportunities for riders to do something special which means the record books need to be updated. Lukas Pöstlberger became the first Austrian to win a stage as well as the first to lead to race. There have in fact been been three riders to lead the race for the first time. Before the 1st stage there had been 259 different riders to have led the Giro over its 99 editions. That number will have to change but so will the total for the number of riders to have worn the Maglia Rosa. Only 237 riders have worn the pink jersey as leaders of the Giro because the first one wasn’t awarded till 1931.

In 1930 the Gazzetta dello sport who were the organisers of the Giro d’Italia decided that the leader of their race should be easily identified from the rest of the riders. It would add excitement for the fans at the roadside but also give the newspaper something new to talk about and increase its sales. So the idea of the Maglia Rosa was born. The colour pink was chosen because it was the same colour as the paper that the Gazzetta was printed on.  There were some high up officials in the fascist party, who wanted to promote Italy as a macho country, that thought it a too delicate colour for a sports contest but the decision had been made and the Maglia Rosa would be used in the 1931 Corsa Rosa.

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Giro 100. The Giro Comes To The Home Of The Shark.

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Photo from Alo B. on flickr

Today the Giro reaches Messina, the home of the most talented Italian rider of recent times, Vincenzo Nibali. The current champion is one of only six riders to have won all three grand tours and was seen something of a saviour for Italian cycling at the start of the decade when there were fewer top riders and fewer top Italian teams. The decline in Italian teams in the World Tour reached its zenith the year after the demise of the Lampre squad meaning their number has reached zero. And now with ‘The Shark Of Messina’ reaching 32 Italian cycling fans are desperate for a new hero to emerge.

Fabio Aru, missing this years Giro due to injury, is the obvious heir to Nibali but after a disappointing 2016 he still has much to improve before becoming a reliable champion. As he gets older and reaches prime Grand Tour age perhaps he will be able to help Italy keep its proud tradition of winners at the Giro going.

Of the 99 Giri 69 have been won by 41 different Italians. It wasn’t until 1950 that the first foreign rider, Hugo Koblet of Switzerland, won. After that the Italians had to share the prize with an increasing number of countries such as Luxembourg, France, Belgium and Sweden. At the start of the 90’s the hosts had to go three years without a win but Ivan Gotti’s victory in 1997 saw the return of Italian domination.

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Giro 100. Crazy Heart On Crazy Mountain.

Not many sports hold events on volcanoes but, pardon the clichè, cycling is not just any sport. The Giro d’Italia makes a visit to Mount Etna on the island of Sicily today and as it has done in the past it’s almost seen as no big thing. The mountain is still far from ordinary though and the same can be said of the winner of the stage finishing up Etna in the 1967 Giro. It could even be said that Franco Bitossi was more like Etna then his rivals chasing him that day.

Bitossi was known as falena or ‘moth’ as his smooth pedalling style could make it seem as if he was floating. His victories seemed to be achieved in a state of calm but like Etna every so often the peace was shattered by something deep within. Falena wasn’t his only nickname, he was also known as cuore matto or ‘crazy heart’.

The Tuscan had been diagnosed with heart-rate problems early on in his career and his beats could reach 220 in a minute on occasion. It’s not certain whether he had an irregular heartbeat or was suffering from a psychological problem like panic attacks but one thing was clear, whatever the condition it wasn’t an ideal one for a professional cyclist to be suffering from. The only advice his doctor could give him, apart from to quit altogether, was to stop riding when his heart rate got to high. Fans at the side of the road would witness the bizarre scene of the leader of the race flying past them only for him to stop, get off his bike and watch as the rest of the race passes him and continue up the road. If his pulse raced up towards the finishing line he would continue but seemingly in slow motion, grinding his way along flat finishing straights as if he was going up the Mur de Huy. There is footage of him at the of 1972 World Championships approaching the finish with a seemingly unassailable lead when he suddenly starts weaving along the road looking as if he is pedalling through mud. He is eventually pipped on the line by his Italian team-mate Marino Basso.

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Giro 100. Cagliari And The Lion King.

Today’s stage finishes in Cagliari on the south coast of Sardinia. The last rider to cross the line there first in a stage of the Giro d’Italia was Alessandro Petacchi in 2007. But as he was found to have high levels of salbutamol in his system later on in the race his results were annulled*. So the last rider to cross the line first in Cagliari and still be the official winner is Mario Cipollini.

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Photo by Amato de Napoli

It was 1991 and the victory was the 24 year old’s 4th Giro stage win, it was evident that he was hungry and able to win plenty more. Confident as the youngster was though he might not have thought at some point he would be gunning for Alfredo Binda’s record number of stage wins at the Giro. The benchmark of 41 had stood firm since 1933. Learco Guerra came closest to it with 31 stages by the end of the 30’s and Eddy Merckx had “only” managed 24 through the 60’s and 70’s.

But Cipollini had arrived in a different time than Binda, Guerra and Merckx. The era of epic performances in black and white was over, the colour television age had arrived and ‘Super Mario’ knew how to benefit from this time both on and off the bike. Cippo forged himself a flamboyant image and is as well known for the tiger print and muscle skin suits he wore during time trials than he is for his wins. As the years pass he is getting known for wearing less and less as he wastes no opportunity to show off his impressive physique. One of his many nicknames is the “Italian Stallion” and according to his Wikipedia page he is rumoured to be a womaniser. All of this made him incredibly marketable and very rich but he also needed to be winning to keep his legend alive.

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Giro 100. What? No Team Time Trial? And The 1912 Team Race.

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Photo by Sean Rowe on flickr.

2017 will be the second year in a row that there will be no Team Time Trial at the Giro d’Italia. This comes after a decade of them being a regular feature in one of the first five stages of the race. As someone who enjoys a team time trial I’m hoping they make a return in future editions. You used to be able to count on one being in the Giro and Tireno-Adriatico which was good as the Tour de France and shorter French stage races hardly ever bother with them.

I enjoy them for a number of reasons. Firstly, they are incredibly photogenic. Lines of colourful riders on shining TT bikes is to me top class bike porn. Watching the lines break up as the riders start rotating can also be quite mesmerising to watch. However you can quickly snap out of this meditative state as any rider who crashes will often take down a number of his teammates with him.

This sense of it being a team event is another thing I like about the team time trials. A rider with ambitions for the GC will only get the same time as his teams fifth fasted rider so everyone has to pull together. When they do it presents an opportunity for one of the lesser riders to get a great reward. Usually gregarios grind themselves down in service of their leader and have little to show for it. If their team wins the time trial though they can get given the chance to become race leader. In recent years Svein Tuft, Salvatore Puccio, Ramunas Navardauskas and Marco Pinotti have benefited from being allowed to be the first across the line of the fasted team thus donning the Maglio Rosa the next day.

There was one edition of the race where the riders finishing time contributed to who won the race in every single stage.

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Ripwell Reports. What’s In The Jiffy Bag?

It has been almost three months since the Fancy Bears international hack team leaked the medical documents which showed Bradley Wiggins had received three highly questionable medical treatments during his days as a Grand Tour contender. It has been two months since the revelation of a potentially sinister package being transported across Europe by Team Sky employees. It seemed for a while that Wiggins and Sky’s worlds could come crashing down. The one man who could have helped the situation, David Brailsford, has remained fairly quiet, possibly wanting the whole thing to blow over. After a period of relative respite that tactic may have been working but things will start hotting up again as on Monday the 19th of December Brailsford will need to appear in front of the Culture, Media and Sport Select Committee in Parliament.

With the story being quite a mess and so many unanswered questions I sent my undercover reporter, the well known historian and cyclist, Giles Ripwell on the case to summarise what has been going on and try to answer the what everyone wants to know.

Ripwell Reports. What’s In The Jiffy Bag?

It has been over a year since I last rubbed shoulders with the fellow going by the name of Mr Bradley Wiggins-Sir. I was riding for his side TEAM wiggins in the Tour de of Britain and remember having jolly good chats with him during the stages. Since then I hadn’t heard much from him. Apparently the British weather had finally got to much for him in his old age and he would only cycle on the indoors roads doing Olympic Pursuits. I thought he had forgotten his old pal Giles until he called me in July. He was very emotional and explained to me through sobs that the dastardly Mr Chris Froomes had won another yellow jersey. A couple of months later I heard from him again but this time he was in much better spirits. Jingos! He had won another Olympic gold medal and told me it was now Wiggo-Sir 5 FroomesDog 0. Since then, as you might have heard, he has been involved in a touch of controversy and I was sent on the case to find out was has been happening. I tried contacting him to see if he could give me any information but I was told that he’s only talking to his new best friend, some fellow going by the name of Mr Andrew Marr. So with Mr Wiggins-Sir gone quiet I had to figure out what has been happening myself.

The whole situation started in September when some Russian computer buffs started a fancy new website where you can go and look at medical files of athletes that have been in the Olympics. It caused quite a stir to begin with until everyone realised that most of the athletes medical information was stuff we already knew or contained information on drugs and medical practices which everyone has agreed for a while should be more tightly monitored. Unfortunately for Mr Bradley Wiggins-Sir his information was among that of a small group of people who’s information raised some alarm bells. Three of Wiggins-Sir’s courses of drugs looked highly suspicious and one of those was just before the Tour de France which he won against Mr Chris Froomes. I have complete faith in my good friend though and firmly believe that those drugs were taken for genuine medical reasons and not to enhance his performance. There would be no need for him to dishonestly take any drugs to win the race as I’ve been told of an unsavoury character calling himself Mr Sean Yaytes who would have brought harm to anyone trying to beat Mr Wiggins-Sir, including his team mate the scoundrel Mr Froomes.

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